The Potato Project (Soho)

Even in my darkest times while living in Australia (it’s true, I used to complain more than I should have, it’s really not that bad), there was always one thing about it that gave me hope in a better life, in the existence of a higher purpose: Spud Bar. Something as simple as a baked potato with all the filing one could wish is the perfect evolution of “fast food” that also doesn’t make me feel like I’ve just drank antifreeze.

So think of the joy when I realized the Spud Bar has a London equivalent: the Potato Project.

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Pizza Pilgrims

One would hazard to think that with a name of Pizza Pilgrims, it would indicate a place for whom aficionados of the dish would travel extensive journeys to come here and eat. But in all honesty if feels more like one of those places near Lourdes where people, more forced by a lack of options than by actual choice, go to eat at.
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Dstrkt

The inconspicuous entrance of Dstrkt is oddly reminiscent of places I would expect to be frequented by Russian gangsters; sleek, hidden, with a hint of modern and glamour. The sakura (cherry-blossom) flower patterned dressing screens adorning the walls, the spacious room down all the stairs, it all made me think, ultimately, of Transistor (for all those gaming geeks out there).

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Gail’s Bakery (Soho)

Truthfully, I am jealous of Soho and the myriad of bakeries and cafes that it has to offer, the sheer unlimited potential for meeting friends of work mates during a break or two. To some extent, I do feel less bad when I realize that many of them are a hit-and-miss, and Gail’s Bakery kinda fits that description as well.

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Eat Tokyo (Soho)

Japan has been a dominant force within gastronomy – with countless restaurants serving up delicious treats around the world. Eat Tokyo, a chain in London, seems to fall a bit short of the general Japanese standards.

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Foxcroft & Ginger

With a name like Foxcroft & Ginger, anyone should expect a cafe teeming with spies, Inspector Gadgets and the sorts. As snugly hid as any cafe can be in Soho, there was certainly an atmosphere that made me think of documents exchange, of plotting and all the good stuff really. There were also pretty lights there.

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The Friendly Society

It has been long overdue that I start reviewing some gay bars – if only in the hope of shepherding all those lost souls to the most appropriate of venues. Considering this, Soho might seem like a strange place to start for exploring the gay scene, considering the slow death it seems to have been condemned to. Despite this, however, it is the most central hub and still incredibly popular.

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Damson & Co

From the outside in, with its dimly lit candle light and wooden insides, Damson & Co made me think of that sort of place where secret poet societies go to murmur a few verses to each other. Darkness offers a certain kind of intimacy vital to gossiping and at times having a good time. Unless that darkness is at the end of an alleyway, in which case maybe you should just run.

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Nopi

Some places make it clear that they intend to impress – from the ritzy Bob Bob Ricard to the elegant Gilbert Scott – and Nopi is right there with them. The way you are greeted warmly at the entrance, the white marble interior and the moody lighting seems to provoke enough of an atmosphere for this place to be packed.

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Bunnychow

Whenever I passed through Soho, a small sign saying “South African” cuisine would always catch my eye, perhaps due to its rarity within the London food scene. That, or because the area generally assaults me with signs saying “tantric massages” and “peep show”, or have someone whisper to me whether I want hashish, so the change was both unusual and welcoming.

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